Technology Errors

PHP Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 33554432 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 7680 bytes)

I recently reinstalled CentOS on a server for a client and then proceeded to install their WordPress web site on the fresh install of CentOS Linux. After working through various minor issues the WP site was up and functioning without issue but after a week or so they contacted me to let me know that they could no longer view items in their FAQ system via the WordPress administration site. The FAQ system is a WordPress plugin called FAQ Builder and is a great little system for frequently asked questions. Below I describe the error received when attempting to access the FAQ Builder admin and what I did to resolve the issue.

Technology Insights

WordPress theme.php – Fatal error: Call to a member function read()

In the process of creating a mirror image of a current WordPress to be used for development purposes I ran into a PHP error that I had not seen before. The current version of WordPress was working without issue but because many of the settings needed to be modified for the installation to work with a different domain pointed to it. Even after modifying the settings that I had modified in previous instances to make WordPress work with an updated domain name I was still getting an error related to the WordPress Theme. I enabled some PHP error logging, started looking for answers on the web, and then implemented some changes described below to resolve the error.

Technology Insights

Install ionCube Loader on a Linux Server Running Litespeed Web Server with PHP

Installing the ionCube loader on a Litespeed web server is easy. You will typically be required to install ioncube when you are running software that a company is attempting to protect. Sometimes the company will protect all of the code and other times the company might only protect some of the PHP code. The easiest way to install the ionCube loader is to modify the php.ini file located in the /etc/ directory by default.

Install ionCube Loader on Litespeed Web Server:

Technology Insights

Upgrade PHP Version 5.1 to PHP Version 5.2 With Yum On a CentOS Server Running ISPConfig

I ran into some errors with my PHP modules on a CentOS server running ISPConfig to host web sites. I decided instead of in depth troubleshooting that it might be easier to go ahead and upgrade PHP since by default the yum package manager will limit you to PHP version 5.1 yet I knew that PHP version 5.2 had been out for a long time. What I needed to do was locate a yum repository that would allow me to upgrade PHP to version 5.2 using yum. The catch was to make sure that every necessary PHP module had an updated package available via the new yum repository. Below I describe upgrading PHP version 5.1 to PHP version 5.2 on CentOS running ISPConfig.