Posts Tagged “ls”

Continuing Google Chrome downloads that have been canceled because of a crashed browser, a Windows bluescreen, or some other reason is quite easy by using the tools available via Linux. The primary tool used to continue downloading files on a Linux computer is called wget and can be obtained for Windows using the information below. If a Chrome download has been cancelled for some reason you can continue downloading the file using wget as explained below. I am surprised there is not a extension that provides a resume feature yet however I imagine one will be coming along in the near future.

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Counting files in Linux is fairly easy by simply listing the files using ls and then using the wc application. Both the ls application and the wc application are core Linux applications and should be installed by default on your server. One thing that I had forgotten how to do was how to count all files in a specific directory as well as all files in each sub directories. The second method I will display below is not 100% accurate because it will count sub directories twice however it is likely you just need a round about method to get an idea of how many files and sub directories you are working with. Below I describe first how to count all files and directories within a single directory and second how to count all the files, sub directories, and files within the sub directories via a Linux shell or command prompt.

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Earlier today I was upgrading some packages on a CentOS Linux server and was curious what applications were actually installed with the coreutils RPM package. I knew that this was one of the main RPM packages that had a ton of various applications installed with it however I was not sure specifically which ones. Below are some examples of how to use RPM to find out exactly what is installed with a specific RPM package.

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Alex and I got some new laptops the other day. I have been a Linux user primarily for many years but the laptop came with Windows 7 so I decided to give it a spin. I must say on the whole I have to say it is a very fast and usable operating system. There is just one thing I was missing and that was Linux shell commands in the terminal. Nothing fancy but I am so used to using ls,rm and grep that I almost went back to Linux. But then Alex mentioned something about adding Cygwin to his laptop which I am of course familiar with but he also mumbled about adding it to the path. I had never even considered this, so I did it and wow is it cool. All the commands I love are in my terminal now. Plus if you use console.exe you can have tabs and every thing.

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Earlier when attempting to install the request-log-analyzer gem on a CentOS Linux server I ran into some issues. I noticed that on one server I was able to install the request-log-analyzer gem without issue but on another server running the same version of CentOS and Ruby as the first server the attempt to install request-log-analyzer returned an error. The error was that the gem required a newer version of another gem.

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