Posts Tagged “IP”

The arping application is a simple command that will allow you to ping devices by hostname, IP address, or MAC address. The unfortunate part is that most device will not respond to the arp requests, which are directed broadcast ICMP echo requests, though there are some out there that do. I go into more detail below regarding pinging via MAC address by providing an example of the typical output, example output when a MAC address responds to the ICMP echo requests, and details about how to configure hosts to respond to these ICMP echo requests. I also show a couple of the switches available with arping and provide examples of using arping to ping devices by IP and host.

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The dnsenum.pl Perl script as described in its Perl documentation is a multithreaded script to enumerate information on a domain and to discover non-contiguous IP blocks. So the gist of dnsenum is to gather information about a specific domain using various sources. Information gathered about a domain includes sub domains, associated IP ranges, name servers, mx records, reverse DNS records, hostname IP addresses, and potential vulnerabilities via zone transfers. Below we go into detail regarding the switches available with dnsenum as well as what the command returns by default without and CLI switches.

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While working on an upcoming article for QD I ran into an issue with the dnsenum.pl Perl script. I followed the process of installing the optional Perl modules and when I went back to test dnsenum it would no longer return any IP addresses. Instead of dnsenum returning actual IP addresses it was returning odd characters. It turns out there is some form of conflict between dnsenum.pl and the Net::DNS Perl module. Below I describe the dnsenum issue in more detail and provide a work around by manually downgrading the Net::DNS Perl module by hand.

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In the Backtrack menu under Information Gathering > Network Analysis > SMB Analysis there is a menu item named smbclient which should actually be named smbclient.py. While the smbclient.py script does actually use smbclient it provides a different interface, commands, no switches, etc. making it fairly different than smbclient itself. While both smbclient and smbclient.py are supposed to provide the same end results they don’t because smbclient.py is extremely buggy so I will be writing an article on each so there is no confusion.

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A company asked me to analyze some of their network traffic to verify some of the projects they are working on to cut costs won’t impact their business. One of the projects includes removing a 100 Mbps fiber connection to their colocation and replacing it with a cable modem that is asynchronous with 50 Mbps download and 5 Mbps upload. Unfortunately they do not have any solid historical network data capture software such as Cacti so before setting up such a service I had to provide initial data via what was available. One of the tools I was able to use was the dashboard data that lives in memory on their FortiGate 200A. Below is information on where to find this information in the FortiGate 200A dashboard.

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