Information Security

exiftool – Backtrack 5 – Forensics – Digital Forensics Analysis – exiftool

Many people still seem to not be aware of EXIF data and the information it provides anyone that wants to view it. EXIF data is attached to image files as well as other files and provides all sorts of details from file creation time to exact GPS coordinates. This is the type of data that was extracted from an image uploaded by Vice Magazine that gave away John McAfee’s location when he escaped Belize. On Backtrack Linux there are numerous tools to extract EXIF data including exiftool which is written in Perl and easy to use. Below we will describe exiftool, which is located in /pentest/misc/exiftool/ or /usr/bin, and provide examples to show how easy it is to use.

Information Security

View iPhone Image Location Data With Preview On Mac OSX

Yesterday I wrote an article on viewing iPhone image GPS data via Photoshop on the Mac but since not everyone has the need to have Photoshop along with the fact that Photoshop is not cheap I also wanted to show a way to view iPhone image GPS data without having to install any third party software on your Mac.  You can easily view iPhone image GPS data using Preview which is installed by default on Mac OSX. Below I describe how to view iPhone image GPS data using the same example image from yesterday with Preview.

Information Security

View iPhone Image Location Data With Photoshop CS5

Yesterday I read an article on location data that is included with all images taken on your iPhone. This type of location data, which is also known as Geo Data or GPS Data, is included behind the scenes on all sorts of media that you create on a day to day basis so while I knew this and was familiar with the type of data that is included I had never spent much time looking into this data. Since I typically use Adobe Photoshop to edit images I figured I would start there and see how I can view location data for images taken on my iPhone within Photoshop CS5 which is the current version I am using.

Technology Insights

Creating Wireless Recon Maps with Google Earth, Kismet, GPSD and Backtrack

Part of Wireless Assessments is always getting a visual view of your client set up. I am always looking for new ways to do this however the best way I have found is using a tool called GISkismet which was written by a guy I know named Jabra.  I was getting ready for work this week and I decided to write a quick article on how to do this. All the tools are open source and available on the backtrack 4 cd except Google earth which you must install.