Posts Tagged “Apple”

The arping application is a simple command that will allow you to ping devices by hostname, IP address, or MAC address. The unfortunate part is that most device will not respond to the arp requests, which are directed broadcast ICMP echo requests, though there are some out there that do. I go into more detail below regarding pinging via MAC address by providing an example of the typical output, example output when a MAC address responds to the ICMP echo requests, and details about how to configure hosts to respond to these ICMP echo requests. I also show a couple of the switches available with arping and provide examples of using arping to ping devices by IP and host.

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If your daily driver is a Macbook or similar and you also manage a network that has Microsoft SQL Server running on it then it can be useful to login to those MSSQL Servers remotely. Even if its simply to view database layout or verify a service is running properly by actually connecting to it there is no doubt that having an easy method to connect to Microsoft SQL from OSX is beneficial. There are a bunch of JAVA based clients such as SQuirreL SQL Client or SQLRazor that are great applications but I personally use DBVisualizer or Navicat which are both described in more detail below.

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I needed to use SVN on a new installation of Mountain Lion OSX on my Macbook Pro and initially assumed it would be there because I already had Xcode installed however it was not or was not located in my path. After playing around in the Xcode interface for a moment I located the Command Line Tools package available for download which ended up installing svn on the command line. Below I describe how to verify if SVN is installed on OSX and explain how to install it if it does not already exist.

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The xprobe2 application was built specifically for OS Fingerprinting or being able to accurately guess a servers Operating System. The unfortunate part about xprobe2 is that is extremely outdated and doesn’t even include Windows 7 in its list of OS’s that it can identify. Even though nmap is pretty much the staple for people to use it is still worth discussing xprobe2 because the items it can guess it does a great job at doing so. It may also be possible that you are assessing a network with some really old servers and updated apps don’t include those operating systems anymore so you may get lucky and find the old operating system using xprobe2.

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OK this article is sort of silly and will be fairly short and to the point but earlier I was trying to find the process name of the OSX Lion firewall. During the process of looking for the OSX Lion firewall process name I learned a bunch of little firewall tidbits such as there are a ton of settings you can set from the command line, there are third party OSX Lion Firewall GUI configuration tools, and there are complete third party firewalls available for install on OSX Lion.

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