How to Fix a Dead WRT55AG Version 2 Linksys Wireless Router

Recently I was digging in an old box of routers I have because I was looking for a wireless router to use as a secondary wireless network at my house. The secondary network needed to run WPA but be as secure as possible in every other way so my PSP could connect to it and use the Internet. I located a wrt55AG but the power would not come on and it took a moment but I finally remembered the story behind it. A friend had given me the wireless router saying the lights would not turn on after they used the incorrect plug to plug it in. I don’t know anything about hardware so I decided to give it a go with nothing to lose. Below are the steps taken to fix the router and get it operational again to be used as a secondary wireless router at my house.

Take a WRT55AG Apart:

First you need to take the case off of the wrt55AG. To do this follow the steps below.

  1. Remove Rubber Feet: First remove the rubber feet from the four posts on the bottom of the wrt55AG.
  2. Remove Screws: Remove the two screws located under the front rubber feet of the Linksys WRT55AG as shown in the below image.

    Linksys WRT55AG Screw Holes

  3. Remove Front Piece: Now remove the blue front part of the cover. This takes a bit of force but by pushing down on the dark grey case close to the blue front cover on the top and bottom and pulling apart. You can use a good amount of force without breaking anything.
  4. Separate Top & Bottom: Now with the front cover off you can separate the top and bottom of the remainder of the case without removing any screws, etc.
  5. Remove Circuit Board: There is one screw in the top of the circuit board which when removed will allow you to remove the circuit board from the device.

Investigate and Resolve WRT55AG Damage:

Now investigate what the issue might be with your wrt55AG. In my case there was a blown fuse and diode that was no longer functional as shown in the below image.

WRT55AG Blown Fuse, Bad Diode

The image above shows after I made the modifications to resolve the issue. I wasn’t able to make out the reading on the fuse because it was to fried so I simply used a wire and soldered it to each side of where the fuse would be. The original diode had the markings “PJ4N GDE” which I wasn’t able to find much information on the Internet about. It appears that this part is no longer made but the little information I did receive lead me to a diode with part number SMCJ5V0CA. I ordered the part ($0.66/ea.) from here. I removed the old diode with a soldering gun and replaced it with the new SMCJ5V0CA diode. Since I am not very familiar with hardware stuff I was pretty convinced that this would not fix the problem but to my surprise I now have a operational WRT55AG.

WRT55AG Hardware Tips:

  • Use a multimeter to test the fuse and/or diode
  • A diode is typically bad if it is really hot to the touch

If anyone who knows more about hardware has anything to add please do so because again I know very little regarding hardware, diodes, multimeters, etc.


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