Recently I had to import some files via phpMyAdmin because the web host of my client didn’t allow SSH access to the server or direct access to the MySQL command line. The need was to create a database and restore a previous backup from another database into MySQL. I noticed that on the Import screen there were a couple things I was curious about. First what kKiB meant and if I wanted to how would I change the max size file I could import.

What does kKiB Mean?

kKiB means Kilo Kibibyte. To expand a little bit more a Kilo Kibibyte is similar to a MegaByte. If you have 100 kKiB this is the same as 100 MB.

How can I modify phpMyAdmin max upload size?

Modify your php.ini file which is typically located in the /etc directory. Add or modify the below parameters.

php.ini

post_max_size = 240M
upload_max_filesize = 240M

After making modifications to the php.ini file you must restart your web server for the changes to take effect.

Be careful though because if you have public facing PHP scripts then opening up these options can cause security concerns. These limits are also set so a process does not get stuck taking up valuable resources.


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10 Responses to “phpMyAdmin: During SQL Imports What Does kKiB Mean, How to Modify Max File Import Size”
  1. letsnurture says:

    Alex,thanks for sharing the knowledge about kKib.

    Actually,I wanted to upload a file of 4 Mbs using phpMyAdmin and in “Import” section I found that it allowed maximum of 102 kKib. So I stuck and confused whether does it mean PMA allowed maximum file of size 102 Kb I mean is it as equal as Kb or something else?

    After Googleing I reached here and found the answer.

    Many thanks again

    Web-Farmer
    letsnurture

    [Reply]

    alex Reply:

    Hello,

    No problem. Glad that the information helped out!

    [Reply]

  2. thank you says:

    Thank you so much – I only wish that I’d have found it before I’d split my whole sql file into 150 mini-files!

    [Reply]

    alex Reply:

    Hello thank you,

    No problem. At least you will know what to do next time! Thanks for leaving feedback.

    Thanks.
    alex

    [Reply]

  3. Ben says:

    Thanks for the info, was a bit confused by the meaning, why do they use such a non-standard measurement?

    [Reply]

    alex Reply:

    Hello Ben,

    I personally don’t. I am only explaining what is used by default and it was confusing to me as well which is why I wrote the article to hopefully help explain to others.

    Hope that helps answer your question.

    Thanks.
    alex

    [Reply]

  4. krushna says:

    thanks fro the info. it really helped me…

    [Reply]

    alex Reply:

    Hello krushna,

    Glad it helped out. Thanks for taking the time to leave feedback.

    Thanks.
    alex

    [Reply]

  5. Targenor says:

    Thanks for the information, now i understand why it would be hard to import a mysql database on 809mb whit 113 kKib in phpmyadmin :>

    Great info

    [Reply]

    alex Reply:

    Hello Targenor,

    No problem and your welcome. Thanks for taking the time to post feedback.

    Thanks.
    alex

    [Reply]

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